A Lean Life is a reader-supported site. Any purchases made through links might earn a commission at no cost to you.

Is Pre-Workout Creatine?

David | A Lean Life

Published by David Williams

As an engineer, David loves technical product comparison and analyzing the data to assess top products.

Table of Contents

Is Pre-workout Creatine?

No! Pre-workouts are not creatine, and pre-workout is not creatine! While some pre-workouts contain creatine, it is not the main ingredient in the supplement. So they are not one in the same, but rather only related.

Creatine on its own is not a pre-workout supplement but one ingredient that can be used in combination with others to make up a pre-workout.

So, What’s The Difference Between Creatine And Pre Workout?

While pre-work supplements and creatine work to improve your energy, athletic performance, and strength, they do so in different ways.

Pre-workout ingredient effects deplete quickly, particularly the stimulant components of caffeine. The supplements deliver a quick but short-term boost in alertness and performance. That’s why it’s recommended to take them before hitting the gym.

On the other hand, creatine is more of a long-term supplement. It only produces results after your creatine stores have built up over time. It also doesn’t have rules dictating when you should take it.

Does Creatine Work As A Pre-Workout?

Keeping in mind that you can take creatine on its own or as part of a pre-workout formula, the answer is yes. While it won’t give you a quick boost in alertness and energy like pre-workout ingredients, it will give you a loading dose that will build up over time and aid in your performance.

 As you put in the hard work at the gym, you probably want to get the most out of your workout and reach your fitness goals. Supplements can help do just that. They fuel your body with the right ingredients and can help enhance performance and muscle growth.

Such supplements include pre-work and creatine. They are not-so-secret weapons used by bodybuilders and athletes to boost their performance.

But is pre-workout creatine? Below we’ll break down everything you need to know about these two supplements, what they do, and why you might want to consider them as part of your fitness regimen.

What Is Pre-workout?

Pre-workout supplements are a combination of ingredients, including caffeine, that work together to boost your performance and energy levels. As the name suggests, they are taken before a workout session and provide increased focus, energy, strength, and endurance.

Pre-workout supplements come in powder form that water or your favorite drink. While the ingredient list varies from brand to brand, there are those standard inclusions such as caffeine, BCAAs (branched-chain amino acids), citrulline malate, and beta-alanine.

What Is Creatine?

Creatine PowderCreatine is a natural substance produced in the liver and kidneys and helps provide energy for your muscles. It’s a combination of three primary amino acids: Arginine, Methionine, and Glycine. (1)

While you can get creatine from foods such as fish, steak, and milk, you can also take supplements in the form of powders and capsules.

Creatine supplementation helps increase the amount of creatine stored in your muscles and helps:

  • Reduce fatigue
  • Improve performance
  • Increasing strength
  • Aid muscle growth and recovery

Can You Mix Creatine With Pre Workout?

Benefit of Pre-WorkoutYes! You can combine creatine and pre-workout to get the best of both worlds. In fact, expert trainers recommend it. 

If your pre-workout brand doesn’t contain creatine, consider adding a separate dose to get the most out of your workout. 

Or you can also click below to see our list of the Top 7 Best Pre-Workouts to supercharge your workouts.

Conclusion

Energy dips and fatigue can be real issues. But with the help of pre-work and creatine supplements, you can get back on track. Just remember to talk to your doctor before taking any supplements.

David Williams

David Williams

A diet and fitness enthusiast, David is an ex-Army Airborne Ranger and Infantry soldier with decades of fitness and wellness experience. A West Point graduate with a degree in engineering, he focuses on technical research related to fitness, nutrition, and wellness. He loves the beach, and spending time with his wife and daughters.

References

  1. U.S. National Library of Medicine. (n.d.). Amino acids: Medlineplus medical encyclopedia. MedlinePlus.
    https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm