Outdoor HIIT Workout

Outdoor HIIT Workout

Are you looking for a good outdoor HIIT workout? Have you ever wondered how to make your outdoor training more effective? And more simple?

If that’s the case, you are in luck. In this post, we’ll go over everything you need to know about HIIT: what it is, how it works, what benefits it offers, and how to have quick and effective workouts outdoors.

Ready? Let’s dive in.

What is HIIT, And What Heart Rate Training Zone Should We Utilize?

HIIT stands for high-intensity interval training. As its name suggests, HIIT is done by switching between short bursts of intense exercise followed by periods of recovery.

For example, sprinting is a fantastic example of high-intensity interval training. You perform a short burst of activity (sprint), and then you walk for a bit to recover before doing it again.

Typically, any good HIIT workout would boost your heart rate between 80 and 95 percent of your maximum heart rate (MHR). Then, as you take a break, your heart rate goes down before you push it to this zone again.

Click to learn the heart rate training zones, and how HIIT fits into this picture.

Outdoor HIIT Workout | 15 Minutes

Brisk walk for 5 minutes to fully warm-up

  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 1 minute
  • Sprint for 30 seconds
  • Walk for 5 minutes to Cool Down
 
This is a simple 15-minute HIIT workout, and it does not need to be any more complicated. It can be done nearly anywhere outside, but just make sure you have a solid and consistent surface for sprints.

The Benefits Of An Outdoor HIIT Workout

Having an outdoor HIIT workout offers numerous benefits. Most notably, you can do it almost anywhere. So long as you have 60 to 100 yards of open area, you can do sprints and other activities. It doesn’t even have to be a straight line. 

For example, a basketball court  or a tennis court can also work just as well. To do it on a basketball court or tennis court, just slow down in the corners, and your heart rate will not drop by slowing down for a very brief period.

If you have a large enough back yard, it can also work even if it’s barely 40 yards. Make sure to slow down and turn immediately as you’re near the end to seamlessly pick up your sprint speed. Taking a second-long pause won’t lead to a drop in heart rate, so you shouldn’t worry about it.

Other Options for an Effective Outdoor HIIT Workout

Here are some variations to keep things fresh and new. 

  1. Do sprints on a bike and follow the same pattern: thirty seconds of all-out cycling followed by a minute of leisurely cycling.
  2. Use a jump rope: thirty seconds of hopping as fast as possible and then take a minute to catch your breath.

Another way to go about it is to do a Tabata-style workout. Do thirty seconds of an activity, take a minute to rest up, and then transition to another exercise.

For example:

Sprint for 30 seconds → a minute of rest  Jumping jacks for 30 seconds  a minute of rest  Burpees for 30 seconds  Plyometric push-ups for 30 seconds  a minute of rest  go back to sprints

Some Finer Considerations For Outdoor HIIT

Once you’re done with the high-intensity bout, check your heart rate within a few seconds and make sure that it is above 85 percent of the maximum heart rate.

To get this number, you first need to calculate your maximum heart rate. Use this formula:

220 – age = MHR

Then, multiply that value by 0.80 or 0.85 to get the value you should be at or above.

For example, if you’re forty years old, your maximum heart rate would be around 180.

180 * 0.80 = 153 beats per minute >> this is where HIIT should be!

Simple Outdoor HIIT Workout

Final Safety Considerations for Outdoor HIIT

Aside from this, you should also be mindful of a few other things:

  1. Proper hydration is vital for HIIT as dehydration can lead to muscle cramps. Aim for up to three liters of water per day.
  2. Make sure that the surface you plan to train on is safe. For example, sprinting on a street littered with potholes can lead to an ugly fall and a severe injury.
  3. HIIT is not a good option for beginners because it is incredibly demanding and requires excellent technical proficiency. A small mistake can lead to severe injury. So, work your way up the intensity zone slowly. Push yourself harder once you’re confident that your technique is on point. And ALWAYS check with your physician prior to trying HIIT.

Click to see more HIIT workouts.

David Williams

David Williams

A diet and fitness enthusiast, David Williams is an ex-Army Airborne Ranger and Infantry soldier with decades of fitness and wellness experience. A West Point graduate with a degree in engineering, he focuses on technical research related to fitness, nutrition, and wellness. He loves the beach, and spending time with his wife and daughters.

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